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Pseudo transitives
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Pseudo-transitive verbs are able to provide the outer structure for a transitive complementive predication.

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Pseudo transitives involve examples in which the object must be an anaphoric pronoun referring back to the subject. The predication, bracketed in the examples below, seems resultative, but its literal meaning is lost. Instead, the predication receives a high degree reading, although the high degree may be viewed as the result of the action denoted by the verb:

Example 1

a. Se laket [har slop]
she laugh her loose
She laughed her head off
b. Se wurkje [har dea]
they work them dead
They work very hard
References:
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